Dictators in solidarity with Mubarak

Posted: January 29, 2011 in Algeria, Bashir, Belhassen, Ben Ali, Corruption, Egypt, Gaddafi, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Occupation, Palestinians, Saudi, Sudan, Tunisia, U.S., War crimes

The Joke of the century… these dictators, scared that they may be next, dared to even open their mouths! Dictators supporting dictators. Human lives have no value with these monsters.

Arab States

The first Arab support to Mubarak came from the Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz, who held a telephone conversation Saturday with the Egyptian-soon-to-be-ex-President, in which he expressed his support, and criticized the continuing popular protests since last Tuesday.

The Saudi news agency quoted the Saudi King Abdullah as saying

“Egypt’s Arabism and Islam cannot stand the tampering with their security and stability of some lurking on behalf of freedom of expression among the masses of our sister country Egypt, and the exploitation of blowing their own hatred devastating and traumatizing and burning and looting and try to create malicious havoc.”(translation from Arabic)

From one Dictator to Another

Then the traitor Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, is quoted to have also called Mubarak, saying:

The “Palestinian people” are in solidarity with the Egyptian leadership and people in the current circumstances and the challenges posed.

Abbas the Traitor

Abbas: you do not represent the Palestinian people you degenerate traitor! The Palestinian people are in solidarity with the Egyptian people. Period. You’re next, trust history!

According to the news agency MENA Mubarak also received calls – to express their aspiration to restore calm and stability in Egypt – from Libyan mad-leader Muammar Gaddafi, and King Abdullah II of Jordan, and Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir.

Birds of the feather…

King Abdullah II of Jordan

Image via Wikipedia

The leader de facto of Libya, Muammar al-Gaddafi.

Image via Wikipedi

Omar Hassan Ahmad al-Bashir, president of Suda...

Image via Wikipedia


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Comments
  1. samhenry says:

    Yes, we “eat” oil. It goes into our pharmaceuticals. It powers the tractors to plow the fields.

    Of the countries you mention, few like the United States well enough to sell it to us.

    Arab Muslims themselves have said on TV that they don’t want to see their religion captured by people like the Islamic or Muslim brotherhood. There will be no United States of the Middle East. There will be a Caliphate – very different. No freedom of religion. I don’t see many churches there now and I hear of Christians that have been killed and/or harassed in recent months. They are leaving the Middle East.

    Not all Jews are monsters. There is a big difference between Zionists and Jews per se. It is Zionists that are being unreasonable and dictatorial and brutal in Israel.

    I have never believed in the legitimacy of the Israeli state. One has to suspend belief that they did not just come in and take land in the British Potectorate of Palestine.

    We cannot, however, dismiss history. While there have been many illegal and in appropriate actions in history, the what and the who involved in it is often disputed. The bottom line is that we will ALL need to drop our prejudices or none of us will survive. If China does not get the oil it needs to fuel its economy, the US and Brazil and other countries to which it has loaned money will be at risk. I don’t want my country to be at risk. In this it is a case of survival.

    The American people themselves have been dissatisfied with the actions of the oil companies and the current administration. I appears that ALL oil companies are like rogue nations; all US administrations are corrupt and dictatorial in the past 40 or more years.

    I think we see much the same way but as you say often from different ends of the spectrum. Have you been to my “house” lately? Please see the blog I did about Egypt – it was an essay on its long history. You will see that a great deal of my reference material has come from Al Jazeera,
    http://samandimp.wordpress.com/2011/01/28/centuries-of-egypt-in-our-minds-and-in-our-imaginations/
    The essay began with the picture of a soldier I had seen on Al Jazeera. Couldn’t get it out of my mind and had a devil of a time trying to track it down but I was persistent.

    Thank you for your thorough response. It was helpful — especially the info about oil exports of the various countries. I am so fortunate to have you to talk with about this and to have you perspective.

    • samhenry says:

      PS I have always been opposed to the settlements in Palestine. They defy logic except they feel that they will make Palestine more Zionist. When you know it has held up the so-called Peace Process, to continue it makes you the heavy in the piece.

    • samhenry,

      Let me first say that I have lived and worked in the region – and on both sides, for 18 years. That said, you have stated the key word: “I hear” that many adopt as “fact.”

      The fact is that Arab Christians are a fact of the Middle Eastern culture: in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, and so on.. there are the most magnificent churches – old and new. These stand as a testament to the fact that Christianity is alive and well in the region. I also visited the region recently and was reminded of that fact on a Sunday morning when one hear the actual Church bells call people to prayers! Peek out onto a residential street, and you see Christians families all dressed up as if going to a wedding, walking or getting in their cars to attend mass.

      The Christians leaving the Middle East are those Christians from Palestine who had enough humiliation – like their Muslim counterparts – at the hands of what I call “NaZionism.” Have you seen the movie “Amerika?” I recently rented it and it paints an accurate picture of life under occupation then the relief of getting a Visa and the “escape” to the U.S.. I won’t say anymore. It’s a funny/ sad and entertaining movie.

      By the way, I watch Aljazeera online (live) and have noticed something quite impressive: Egyptians Christians and Muslims are united in their call for the present day Pharaoh to step down! Why would these Christians risk their lives especially in this situation, if they were persecuted?

      I also never said Jews were monsters. But Settlers definitely are. You seem to be quite familiar with the historic facts so I won’t preach to the choir.

      If a Caliphate were to be established in the Middle East, it would be a welcome change. During the Caliphate rule, and as far back as Omar’s regime (the second Caliphate), Christians lived and prospered among the Muslims. His famous story of receiving the keys of Jerusalem from the Greek Orthodox patriarch, Sophronius, and the treaty he signed attest to this fact. A glimpse of this is documented on Wikipedia. Even today, in Jerusalem, the keys to the Church are entrusted to a Muslim family because the different Christian sects there don’t trust each other with the keys!

      During the Caliphates throughout history and as late as Salahuddin, liberator of Jerusalem, Christians and Jews again, were simply as equal as the Muslims. Non-loving Muslim haters will always point out that other faiths (Christians and Jews) were forced to pay a tax for their protection. The fact is that Muslims are mandated to pay 2.5% of their excess income to charity, and in those days the collectors were the equivalent of a bank today. Just one. No other organization would be allowed to do the same. It was taken seriously and considered a holy task. Muslims paid this “tax” and likewise, Christians and Jews paid the same “tax..” just as you and I pay taxes. This money was used to help the poor and needy! Period. The Caliphs took this task so seriously that they went out themselves looking for the poor when none came for help! At one point in time during the Abassid or Ummayat periods, I forget which, the Caliphs could not even find one poor family to give money to! This was the result of a democratic and just rule, that provided freedom to all citizens. Have you seen this post?

      Time for breakfast… I have to learn to reply in shorter sentences! 🙂 I am the fortunate one to have you as one of my 7 readers… and thank you for your kind words.

      ATW

      • samhenry says:

        These articles were interesting and support much of your view. When I say “I hear” it really means I have read somewhere on the internet. But your response made me go deeper into the question – WHY are Christians, in the Middle East for 2,000 years, leaving? Turns out for a myriad of reasons and they differ from country to country.

        There is a common thread: If Christians leave – and Jews for that matter (Egypt) then there is more room for extremism since living side by side reduces fears and tensions. [I know this to be true because I have grown up with Jews and blacks and other groups.] Only 7 readers? I will come more often – although sometimes my work keeps me from visiting anyone else on the web. But hey, I think I am fortunate that at 69, I am still willing to learn – oh God will get me for that prideful moment. Wait while I show him the door. No matter our religion, I think we all carry a kind of “personalized” little part of “God” that makes him more familiar and human and that you dare occasionally to make fun of or take on like Job. Don’t worry, I haven’t seen any burning bushes. Sorry about the length of these articles. I think I will make a post of our conversation tomorrow if I may quote you?

        HABBANIYA CECE, Iraq — The last Christian man in town goes to church each morning to clean the building and to remember the past. Romel Hawal, 48, was born in this town in Anbar Province back when most of the population was Christian. Now, he said, his 11-year-old son knows no other Christians and has no memory of attending a church service.
        Multimedia
        Slide Show
        The Last Christians of Habbaniya Cece

        “When my son swears, it is on the Koran, not the Bible,” Mr. Hawal lamented.

        His wife wants to leave town or leave the country, joining what is becoming an exodus of Christians from Iraq and throughout the Middle East. But Mr. Hawal said he felt an obligation to stay. And he found support from an unlikely source.

        “What gives me courage,” he said, “is that my Muslim brothers say, ‘Don’t leave.’ ”

        https://attendingtheworld.wordpress.com/2011/01/29/dictators-in-solidarity-with-mubarak/#comments

        Pope urges Middle East Christians not to leave their land
        Benedict XVI is deeply concerned about the fate of Christians living in difficult political situations, urges them to have courage.

        Vatican City (AsiaNews) – Pope Benedict XVI said that the “difficult situation which individuals and Christian communities face in the region [the Holy Land] is a cause of deep concern for us all,” adding that local Christians should not to be tempted to leave.

        The Holy Father made the statement during a meeting with the members of the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Oriental Orthodox Churches,

        He also said that in his Christmas message to Catholics living in the Middle East, he told them that he shared the concerns expressed several times by the region’s bishops that Christians might all leave the land in which Jesus was born.

        “Christian minorities,” he noted, “find it difficult to survive in the midst of such a volatile geopolitical panorama and are often tempted to emigrate. In these circumstances, Christians of all traditions and communities in the Middle East are called to be courageous and steadfast in the power of the Spirit of Christ.”

        “May the intercession and example of the many martyrs and saints, who have given courageous witness to Christ in these lands, sustain and strengthen the Christian communities in their faith!”

        http://www.asianews.it/news-en/Pope-urges-Middle-East-Christians-not-to-leave-their-land-8380.html

        Why are their numbers dropping?

        Outside Iraq, which is a unique case, the most common motivator is economics, not persecution. “People want to seek a better life, and that’s relevant for all people in the region, Muslims as well,” says Fiona McCallum, a professor at Scotland’s University of St. Andrews who studies Christian communities in the Middle East. But Christians in the region have traditionally been better positioned to emigrate than their Muslim counterparts because of their higher education levels.

        With a lower birth rate than Muslims, the Christian population would decline even without emigration as Muslim births outpace Christian births. And religious discrimination is also a factor. In Egypt, Coptic Christians say they are subject to systemic government discrimination. And in the Palestinian territories, Christians cite intimidation and land theft.

        Is there more tension with Muslims now?

        The level of sectarian strife in Iraq is certainly elevated. In Israel, relations between Muslims and Christians are generally stable, says Dr. Una McGahern, who recently completed her doctoral thesis on Palestinian Christians in Israel. “While there are elements within both communities who would view the other in more hostile terms, there is a broader consensus of unity and acceptance that exists and that builds on historic patterns of coexistence in the region,” she says. In some cases, she adds, the two communities are brought together by perceived Israeli attempts to sow dissension.

        *
        *

        Where are Christians dwindling most?

        All around the region, Christians made up more than 20 percent of the population in the early 20th century; today, they make up less than 10 percent. Iraq has seen perhaps the most dramatic decline. Estimates of its Christian population at the time of the US-led invasion in 2003 ranged from 800,000 to 1.4 million – roughly 5 percent of the population. But targeted by killings, kidnappings, and threats, many fled – in far higher proportions than their Sunni and Shiite compatriots: an estimated 20 percent of Iraqi refugees abroad are Christians. Only an estimated 500,000 to 600,000 remain.

        Why are their numbers dropping?

        Outside Iraq, which is a unique case, the most common motivator is economics, not persecution. “People want to seek a better life, and that’s relevant for all people in the region, Muslims as well,” says Fiona McCallum, a professor at Scotland’s University of St. Andrews who studies Christian communities in the Middle East. But Christians in the region have traditionally been better positioned to emigrate than their Muslim counterparts because of their higher education levels.

        With a lower birth rate than Muslims, the Christian population would decline even without emigration as Muslim births outpace Christian births. And religious discrimination is also a factor. In Egypt, Coptic Christians say they are subject to systemic government discrimination. And in the Palestinian territories, Christians cite intimidation and land theft.

        Is there more tension with Muslims now?

        The level of sectarian strife in Iraq is certainly elevated. In Israel, relations between Muslims and Christians are generally stable, says Dr. Una McGahern, who recently completed her doctoral thesis on Palestinian Christians in Israel. “While there are elements within both communities who would view the other in more hostile terms, there is a broader consensus of unity and acceptance that exists and that builds on historic patterns of coexistence in the region,” she says. In some cases, she adds, the two communities are brought together by perceived Israeli attempts to sow dissension.

        Sectarian tensions have simmered in Egypt for decades, with periodic eruptions. Earlier this month, Muslims killed six worshipers leaving mass and a security guard – allegedly in revenge for a Christian’s rape of a Muslim girl.

        Hilal Khashan, professor of political studies at the American University in Beirut, says that tension has not increased, but that extra attention is given to violence against Christians, both in Egypt and Iraq. “Acts of violence that are driven by personal issues are frequent, but they only make the news when they involve Muslims against Copts,” he says.

        In Syria, where Christians have fallen to 10 percent, there are fewer tensions, however. President Bashar al-Assad, a member of a religious minority himself, has an interest in keeping sectarian strife at bay, and his regime rigidly cracks down on Islamic extremism. According to Dr. McCallum, many Syrian Christians feel they can participate in state and society, though they complain of discrimination in conversion and interreligious marriage.

        Is the rise of political Islam a factor?

        In Egypt, where women once wore miniskirts on the street, most women are now veiled. It’s one of many signs of the growing role that Islam plays in Egyptians’ lives, which can leave Christians feeling uneasy. “You can’t totally ignore that there has been a rise in political Islam … and obviously if you’re not part of that you will feel a bit different,” says McCallum. As Egypt’s Christians watch the rise of Hamas in the Palestinian territories or Hezbollah in Lebanon, many are increasingly worried about their place in society.

        What effect has the exodus had ­regionally?

        As Christians leave the Middle East, some worry they will leave behind an increasingly polarized society. When members of different religions or sects live side by side, they are more likely to see one another as people, rather than faceless adversaries, says McCallum. The loss of the Christians in the Palestinian territories and Israel, says McGahern, would be particularly tragic. “Diversity necessitates compromise and breeds creativity,” she says. “Without Palestinian Christians or Druze or Muslims, or Jews for that matter, society would become more polarized and political options more rigid.”

        http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Middle-East/2010/0129/Briefing-Why-Christians-are-declining-in-Mideast

        • samhenry says:

          In my first article posted, the url for your comments on this site and the article became intertwined. The citation for the quote is:

          http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/20/world/middleeast/20christian.html

          Have a lovely day out there. Really, the Egyptian people have been remarkably restrained (just the minority criminals and political thugs). It is such a tribute to their history and culture. Also, it has come out in the press that it was plain clothed police who broke into the Cairo Museum and destroyed artifacts. They were caught before they could take anything.

  2. samhenry says:

    Egyptians have proved the characteristics that have made them a great people for two thousand years. They have been overly patient – and without reason. Mubarak does need to go and ideally (but it will not happen this way) in a way in which there is a temporary handover until there can be an internationally observed fair and speedy election. The army cannot just inherit the government although it is the power behind it.

    The dictators know their days are numbered. All of the west is convinced that these countries will fall to militant Muslims. That may happen but the more Muslims I hear interviewed say that the militants have not yet won the day.

    If the Middle East explodes, all bets are off for the rest of the world that needs the oil to eat.

    • Long time no see samhenry!

      My observation/ assessment is a bit different. There is a “militant Jewish” existence in Palestine (aka settlers) who roam the streets with M-16’s, freely fire on Palestinians, while the Israeli army simply looks the other way. Violent barbaric people, they are. On the other side of the coin, there are no “militant Muslims” who do the same in any Arab country. Unless you want to consider Hamas as “militant Muslims” or Hizbollah… but neither of these “militants” are occupying any land by force. Yes, the Middle East will explode: if the Arabs finally continue with their “house cleaning” and establish a democracy, then as I stated in another post, we will end up with a United States of Arabia; a power to reckon with.

      We don’t eat oil, do we? But I read somewhere today that Oil prices have already gone up: by our wonderful oil companies. Why? Besides the fact that they need to make more money in these hard economic times, they are “afraid” that a new democracy in the Middle East will threaten the supplies. Interesting! The Middle East gladly sells its oil to the world. The funny thing is, though, our dependence on oil from the Middle East is 3rd next to Canada and Mexico!

      1. Canada

      Canada reigns as the United States’ leading oil supplier, exporting some 707,316,000 barrels of oil per year (1,938,000 barrels per day) — a whopping 99 percent of its annual oil exports, according to the EIA.

      Canada’s exports to the United States are worth more than $37 billion and account for 16 percent of the total trade between the two countries, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Foreign Trade Statistics. Canada holds the second largest oil reserves in the world after Saudi Arabia. And 95 percent of this oil is in sand deposits in Alberta, which makes the oil extraction process difficult.

      2. Mexico

      Mexico sends more than 400 million barrels of oil per year (or 1,096,000 barrels per day) to the U.S., according to the EIA. In 2009, that flow was worth over $22 billion.

      Since Mexico’s oil wells were nationalized in 1938, the country’s oil industry operates under the control of PEMEX, the second largest oil company in the world.

      3. Saudi Arabia

      Saudi Arabia sends 360,934,000 barrels of oil per year (989,000 barrels per day), 20 percent of its total oil exports, to the United States, according to the EIA. Holding about one-third of the world’s daily oil supply, Saudia Arabia’s economy is fueled by oil. Oil accounts for 90 percent of Saudi Arabia’s export revenues and 45 percent of its GDP, according to the CIA World Factbook.

      4. Venezuela

      Venezuela sends the United States 352,278,000 barrels of oil per year (965,000 barrels per day), according to the EIA. The Venezuelan economy is heavily reliant on oil as it accounts for 90 percent of the country’s export revenue and 30 percent of the country’s GDP, according to the World Factbook. In May 2009, following its socialist policies, Venezuela’s state oil company Petroleoes de Venezuela took over private companies operating in the east of the country, increasing the total number of nationalized oil companies to 74.

      Earlier this month, President Hugo Chavez stated that his government would stop all oil exports to the United States if Washington’s ally, Colombia, attacks Venezuela.

      5. Nigeria

      Nigeria sells 40 percent of its huge oil supply to the United States. Nigeria exports 281,291,000 barrels per year (771,000 barrels per day) to the United States, according to the EIA. But Nigeria is feeling the full brunt of the “oil curse.” The vast earnings from oil have not translated into substantial improvements for ordinary Nigerians. People living in the oil-producing Niger Delta area, in particular, are very poor and the environment has been degraded by oil drilling.

      Beginning in 2006, this reality led rebel groups groups to violently protest against the oil pipelines. The Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta attacked and kidnapped foreign oil workers. The rebel insurrection are blamed for causing Nigeria’s oil production to drop by as much as 20 percent. Furthermore, Nigeria has experienced 2,400 oil spills since 2006, decreasing the industry’s efficiency, according to Reuters.

      6. Angola

      Angola exports 163,790,000 of barrels of oil per year (449,000 barrels per day) to the United States, worth around $9 billion in 2009, according to the EIA. In recognition of its huge oil production, Angola is now the chair of OPEC.

      In May 2008, due to unrest in Nigeria, Angola surpassed Nigeria as the largest oil producer in Africa. The majority of Angola’s wells are located offshore in the Atlantic Ocean due to limited onshore exploration from 1975 to 2002 when the country faced civil unrest. Angola is the world’s seventh largest oil producer but the United States’s sixth largest oil source as it exports 31 percent of its oil to the United States.

      7. Iraq

      Iraq exports 163,684,000 barrels of oil per year to the United States (448,000 barrels per day), worth over $9 billion in 2009, according to the EIA. This makes the United States Iraq’s number one oil export partner.

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