Archive for the ‘UAE’ Category

Washington censors Libyan TV plus Arab TVs covering violent clampdown in Bahrain


On 23 April 2011, Libyan state television antennas were hit by NATO airstrikes. Transmissions were cut off for more than 30 minutes before they could resume.

According to NATO’s mouthpiece, the target were not the antennas – since NATO respects and promotes freedom of the press – but the adjoining compound of Muammar Gaddafi.

Meanwhile, going by Saudi media reports, the U.S. Department of State asked Arabsat, the satellite management company, to suspend broadcasting by Libyan channels.

Moreover, a jamming station – located in rebel-controlled Libyan territory and coordinated with another station operating from Saudi territory – is used by Washington to obstruct any program on Arab television channels, regardless of where they are, covering the brutal repression in Bahrain.

source

People in Bahrain have been holding anti-government protests since February 14, demanding constitutional reforms as well as an end to the Al Khalifa monarchy.

Demonstrators maintain that they will continue to protest until their demands for freedom, constitutional monarchy, and a proportional voice in the government are met.

The peaceful popular movement in Bahrain has been violently repressed, leaving scores of anti-regime protesters killed and many others missing.

Bahrain’s military court has sentenced four anti-government protesters to death, in a move to further crush the ongoing revolutionary movement in the small Persian Gulf country.

This comes while the Manama regime rejects reports by a number of human rights groups on massive rights violations in the country.

According to local sources, Bahraini authorities have raided hospitals, torturing doctors and injuring anti-government protesters in an effort to quell mass protests.

Human Rights Watch, Doctors Without Borders and Physicians for Human Rights have charged Bahraini security officials with systematic attacks on doctors and patients.

Physicians for Human Rights say doctors and nurses have been detained, tortured or disappeared because they have “evidence of atrocities committed by the authorities, security forces and riot police” in the crackdown on anti-government protesters.

Since mid-February, thousands of anti-government protesters in Bahrain, home to the US Navy Fifth Fleet major military base, have poured into the streets calling for an end to Al-Khalifa dynasty, which has ruled the country for over forty years.

On March 13, Saudi-led forces were dispatched to the Persian Gulf island at Manama’s request to quell countrywide protests.

According to local sources, dozens of people have been killed and hundreds arrested so far during the government clampdown on the peaceful demonstrations.

ASH/MB

Source: Press TV

Mona Eltahawy speaking at the J Street Conference 2011 (2.27.11) . These are her complete opening remarks.

History before Our Eyes: Broader Implications of Democracy Movements in the Arab World.

Panelists:

Mona Eltahawy, Journalist
Ron Pundak, Director General, The Peres Center for Peace
Robert Serry, United Nations Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process

Moderator: Steve Clemons, Senior Fellow, New America Foundation
Chair: Ambassador Samuel Lewis, Former American diplomat and former head of the U.S. Institute of Peace

 

Although the US did not explicitly condone nor condemn the GCC’s (Gulf Cooperation Council) latest decision to sanction the deployment of its forces into the island kingdom, the Barack Obama administration has taken a cautious approach to the growing protests there so as not to undermine the opposition parties’ demands or inadvertently strengthen Iran’s ability, real or imagined, to leverage the opposition leaders of Bahrain’s roughly 70 per cent Shia majority.

“We urge the government of Bahrain to pursue a peaceful and meaningful dialogue with the opposition rather than resorting to the use of force,” White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said in a statement Sunday. “In particular, we urge our GCC partners…to act in a way that supports dialogue instead of undermining it.”

 

This is the exact same verbiage (or garbage) the U.S. Administration uses with Israel: “We urge the Israelis and Palestinians to pursue peace talks..” while the Israelis massacre, expel, ethnic cleanse and annex Palestine using brutal and barbaric force, courtesy of the U.S. Tax Payers’ money.

  • When Saddam invaded Kuwait, the U.S. was quick in establishing a No Fly Zone and then invade Iraq to bring the country “democracy.”
  • When South Sudan wanted their freedom, U.S. and Mr. George Hypocrite Clooney rushed to the south’s aid and cries for Hypocrisy.. I mean, Democracy!
  • When Libyans are being massacred by a tyrant thug, responsible for heinous crimes against his own, let alone other people, as in Lockerbie,  and uses planes, tanks and poisonous gases to crush the people, we issue Bahrain-like statements.
  • When Yemeni’s are under daily attack by the most vicious of weapons: chemical gases that paralyze and send bodies into violent convulsions, we issue Bahrain-like statements.
  • When Palestinians wanted to establish their state and live in peace, the U.S. determined (under the direction of its masters, AIPAC Zionist thugs) that “the time wasn’t right” and vetoed the reolution that called for an independent state called Palestine!

In other words, we do not condemn the tyrants unless we are absolutely certain that they will be vacating their seats of power and tyranny. This is the U.S. foreign policy and democracy!

 

  • We preach Democracy and practice Tyranny!
  • We preach Peace and practice Destruction!
  • We preach Justice and practice Injustice!

 

 

The Middle East meant only Israel to many. Now the lives of millions of Arabs have been brought to Europe’s attention

Nick Cohen Nick Cohen The Observer, Sunday 27 February 2011

The Arab revolution is consigning skip-loads of articles, books and speeches about the Middle East to the dustbin of history. In a few months, readers will go through libraries or newspaper archives and wonder how so many who claimed expert knowledge could have turned their eyes from tyranny and its consequences.

The Map erroneously includes Turkey, Iran, Pakistan and Afghanistan as part of the Arab World.

To a generation of politically active if not morally consistent campaigners, the Middle East has meant Israel and only Israel. In theory, they should have been able to stick by universal principles and support a just settlement for the Palestinians while opposing the dictators who kept Arabs subjugated. Few, however, have been able to oppose oppression in all its forms consistently. The right has been no better than the liberal-left in its Jew obsessions. The briefest reading of Conservative newspapers shows that at all times their first concern about political changes in the Middle East is how they affect Israel. For both sides, the lives of hundreds of millions of Arabs, Berbers and Kurds who were not involved in the conflict could be forgotten.

If you doubt me, consider the stories that the Middle Eastern bureau chiefs missed until revolutions that had nothing to do with Palestine forced them to take notice.

• Gaddafi was so frightened of a coup that he kept the Libyan army small and ill-equipped and hired mercenaries and paramilitary “special forces” he could count on to slaughter the civilian population when required.

Leila Ben Ali, the wife of the Tunisian president, was a preposterously extravagant figure, who all but begged foreign correspondents to write about her rapacious pursuit of wealth. Only when Tunisians rose up did journalists stir themselves to tell their readers how she had pushed the populace to revolt by combining the least appealing traits of Imelda Marcos and Marie-Antoinette.

• Hearteningly, for those of us who retain a nostalgia for the best traditions of the old left, Tunisia and Egypt had independent trade unionists, who could play “a leading role”, as we used to say, in organising and executing uprisings.

Far from being a cause of the revolution, antagonism to Israel everywhere served the interests of oppressors. Europeans have no right to be surprised. Of all people, we ought to know from our experience of Nazism that antisemitism is a conspiracy theory about power, rather than a standard racist hatred of poor immigrants. Fascistic regimes reached for it when they sought to deny their own people liberty. The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, the forgery the far-right wing of the decaying tsarist regime issued in 1903 to convince Russians they should continue to obey the tsar’s every command, denounces human rights and democracy as facades behind which the secret Jewish rulers of the world manipulated gullible gentiles.

Syrian Ba’athists, Hamas, the Saudi monarchy and Gaddafi eagerly promoted the Protocols, for why wouldn’t vicious elites welcome a fantasy that dismissed democracy as a fraud and justified their domination? Just before the Libyan revolt, Gaddafi tried a desperate move his European predecessors would have understood. He tried to deflect Libyan anger by calling for a popular Palestinian revolution against Israel. That may or may not have been justified, but it assuredly would have done nothing to help the wretched Libyans.

In his Epitaph on a Tyrant, Auden wrote:

“When he laughed, respectable senators burst with laughter
And when he cried, the little children died in the streets.”

Europe’s amnesia about how tyranny operated in our continent explains why the Libyan revolution is embarrassing a rich collection of dupes and scoundrels who were willing to laugh along with Gaddafi. His contacts in Britain were once confined to the truly lunatic fringe. He supplied arms to the IRA, funded the Workers’ Revolutionary Party, Vanessa Redgrave’s nasty Trotskyist sect, and entertained Nick Griffin and other neo-Nazis. We should not forget them when the time comes to settle accounts. But when Tony Blair, who was so eloquent in denouncing the genocides of Saddam, staged a reconciliation with Gaddafi after 9/11, his friendship opened the way for the British establishment to embrace the dictatorship.

It was not only BP and other oil companies, but British academics who were happy to accept his largesse. The London School of Economics took £1.5m from Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, money which by definition had to have been stolen from the Libyan people, despite being warned to back away by Professor Fred Halliday, the LSE’s late and much-missed authority on the Middle East, who never flinched from looking dictators in the eye.

“I’ve come to know Saif as someone who looks to democracy, civil society and deep liberal values for the core of his inspiration,” purred the LSE’s David Held as he accepted the cheque.

Human Rights Watch, once a reliable opponent of tyranny, went further and described a foundation Saif ran in Libya as a force for freedom, willing to take on the interior ministry in the fight for civil liberties. Meanwhile, and to the surprise of no one, Peter Mandelson, New Labour’s butterfly, fluttered round Saif at the country house parties of the plutocracy.

Last week, Saif, the “liberal” promoter of human rights and dining companion of Mandelson, appeared on Libyan television to say that his father’s gunmen would fight to the last bullet to keep the Gaddafi crime family in business, a promise he is keeping. The thinking behind so many who flattered him was that the only issue in the Middle East worth taking a stand on was the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and that the oppression of Arabs by Arabs was a minor concern.

 

 

The longevity of the regimes presided over by the Gaddafi, Assad and Mubarak families and the House of Saud ought to be a reason for denouncing them more vigorously, but their apparent permanence added to the feeling that somehow Libyans, Syrians, Egyptians and Saudis want to live under dictatorships.

The European Union, which did so much to export democracy and the rule of law to former communist dictatorships of eastern Europe, has played a miserable role in the Middle East. It pours in aid but never demands democratisation or restrictions on police powers in return. That will have to change if the promise of the past month is to be realised. If it is to help with democracy-building, Europe will need to remind itself as much as the recipients of its money that you can never build free societies on the racist conspiracy theories of the Nazis and the tsars. They are and always have been the tunes that tyrants sing.

QADDAFI’S HORRIFIC CRIMES – VERY GRAPHIC!
What are these people thinking?
Are they that dumb, deaf and blind?

They all repeat the same thing… it’s as if they have the same mother.. or father (Ramses II) for that matter!

Some Predictions for the remaining morons!

 

 

 

 

 

Costumes of Arab women, fourth to sixth century.

You've Come A Long Way Baby!

 

Woman from Damascus, Muslim woman from Mecca, ...

Different Traditional Costumes

The US State Department has admitted that American military cooperation with Yemeni officials includes military aid to maintain “stability” of the Sana’a regime.

According to the State Department, military relations between Yemen and the United States are steadily improving with the resumption of International Military Education and Training assistance and the transfer of military equipment and spare parts, Press TV’s Marjan Asi reports from Washington.

However, political analysts believe that the so-called “security” and “stability” that the US has been promoting in Yemen is actually intended to keep the embattled ruler Ali Abdullah Saleh in power.

The majority of Yemenis are unhappy with the expanding US military ties with their government, especially considering the harsh crackdown on protesters in recent days. This has led to an uneasy alliance between the two governments, facing an uncertain future.

In recent days, thousands of Yemeni protesters have taken to the streets across the country, calling for the ouster of Saleh.

The Yemeni president has described the pro-democracy protesters as “elements of a coup.”

Saleh, in power for 33 years, said that he would leave power after his term expires in 2013. He has also promised not to hand power to his son.

The Yemeni incumbent president has also pledged to raise wages of government employees and to provide 60,000 job opportunities for university graduates.

The Yemeni government crackdown on protesters, inspired by revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia, has so far left at least 24 people dead.

The US also occasionally carries out drone attacks in Yemen. Despite such extraordinary measures, the country has grown increasingly unstable.