Posts Tagged ‘Hasbara’

AIPAC: Un-American!

Posted: February 19, 2019 in AIPAC, Hasbara
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No doubt that you’ve heard about the Aljazeera documentary that exposed AIPAC-style organization in the UK or the most recent documentary about AIPAC in the U.S. This is Episode 1 of 4

AIPAC’s agenda and the government of Israel’s Hasbara go hand-in-hand and among their goals are to:

  • Discredit the Messenger as a means to discredit the message
  • Stress that BDS is a “hate movement!”
  • “We are a different government, working on foreign soil… and we have to be very, very cautious… Speaking to a gathering of the pro-Israel lobby in Washington
Sima Vaknin-Gil

We have three different sub-campaigns, which are very, very sensitive, regarding data gathering, information analysis, working on activists organizations, money trail.. This is something that only a country with its resources can do the best”

Sima Vaknin-Gil, Director General of Israel’s Ministry of Strategic Affairs

If you want to win [against BDS] we have to change our ways. We have to think differently. And this is waging a holistic campaign against the other side. Take him out of his comfort zone. Make him be on the defensive.

In the United States, the Lobby (AIPAC) is working with Israel to spy on American citizens.

We are giving them (Israel) data, for example, one day Sima’s deputy is sending me a photo, just a photo on WhatsApp. It’s written “Boycott Israel” on a billboard.

Sagi Balasha, CEO of AIPAC 2011-2015 – Now works with cyber-intelligence organizations to target BDS activists.

In a few hours, our systems can find the exact organization, people and even their names, where they live. We gave it back to the ministry and I have no idea what they did with this. But the fact is, three days later, there were no billboards.

Sagi Balasha

We use all sorts of technology. We use corporate level, enterprise-grade social media intelligence software. Almost all of this happens on social media, so we have custom algorithms and formulae that acquire this stuff immediately

Jacob Baime, the Executive Director of the Israel on Campus Coalition

In terms of information sharing, we did add the Ministry of Strategic Affairs to our operations and intelligence brief. Which kind of goes back to how do we get information, about what’s going on on American college capuses.

Ian Hersh, Director of Operation of Israel on Campus Coalition

ANGRY YET? These people are evil… they’re traitors working for a foreign Apartheid racist state and they must be treated as spies, imprisoned and deported!

The History of Israel Reconsidered:

A Talk by Ilan Pappe

Professor Ilan Pappe is an Israeli historian and senior lecturer of Political Science at Haifa University. He is the author of numerous books, including A History of Modern Palestine, The Modern Middle East, The Israel/Palestine Question and, most recently, The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine, published in 2006. On March 8, he spoke at a small colloquium in Tokyo organized by the NIHU Program Islamic Area Studies, University of Tokyo Unit, on the path of personal experiences that brought him to write his new book. The following is a transcript of his lecture, tentatively titled “The History of Israel Reconsidered” by organizers of the event.

03/20/07 “Dissidentvoice” — – –Ilan Pappe: Thank you for inviting me, it’s a pleasure to be here. I hope that you will ask me, afterwards, questions of a more general nature because I’m not sure how much I can cover in 40, 45, 50 minutes. I will be a bit personal, to begin with, and then move to the more general issues. I think it will help to understand what I am doing.

I was born in Israel and I had a very conventional, typical Israeli education, and life, until I finished my B.A. studies at Hebrew University, which was many years ago in the mid-1970s. Like all Israeli Jews, I knew very little on the Palestinian side, and met very few Palestinians. And although I was a very keen student of history, already in high-school, I knew I would be a historian. I was very loyal to the narrative that I was taught in school. I had very little doubt that what my teachers taught me in school was the only truth about the past.

Because when you go out, you see things that you would find very difficult to see from within. And I chose as a subject for my doctoral thesis the year of 1948, because even without knowing much the past, I understood that this is a formative year.

My life was changed, in a way; definitely my professional life, but after that also my private and public life when I decided to leave Israel and do my doctoral dissertation outside the country. Because when you go out, you see things that you would find very difficult to see from within. And I chose as a subject for my doctoral thesis the year of 1948, because even without knowing much the past, I understood that this is a formative year. I knew enough to understand that this is a departure point for history, because for one side, the Israelis, 1948 is a miracle, the best year in Jewish history. After two thousand years of exile the Jews finally establish a state, and get independence. And for the Palestinians it was exactly the opposite, the worst year in their history, as they call it the Catastrophe, the Nakba, almost the Holocaust, the worst kind of year that a nation can wish to have. And that intrigued me, the fact that the same year, the same events, are seen so differently, on both sides.

..one day you wake up and you say: wait a minute, there’s someone else here, maybe they see history differently and if you are a genuine intellectual, you should strive to have respect for someone else’s point-of-view, not only yours.

Being outside the country enabled me to have more respect and understanding, I think, to the fact that maybe there is another way of looking at history than what I lived not only my own world, my own people’s way, my own nation’s way. But this was not enough, of course. This was not enough to revisit history, this attitude, this fact that one day you wake up and you say: wait a minute, there’s someone else here, maybe they see history differently and if you are a genuine intellectual, you should strive to have respect for someone else’s point-of-view, not only yours.

I was lucky that the year I decided to study the other side was the year when, according to the Israeli law of classification of documents every 30 years the Israeli archives declassify secret material, 30 years for political matters, and 50 years for military matters. When I started in Oxford, in England, in the early 1980s, quite a lot of new material about 1948 was opened. And I started looking at the archives in Israel, in the United Kingdom, in France, in the United States, and also the United Nations opened its archives when I started working on this. They had interesting archives in Geneva, and in New York.

And suddenly I began to see a picture of 1948 that I was not familiar with. It takes historians quite a while to take material and turn it into an article or a book, or a doctoral thesis, in this case.

And suddenly I began to see a picture of 1948 that I was not familiar with. It takes historians quite a while to take material and turn it into an article or a book, or a doctoral thesis, in this case. And after two years, I, at least, found that I had a clear picture of what happened in 1948, and that picture challenged, very dramatically, the picture I grew up with. And I was not the only one who went through this experience. Two or three, maybe four, historians partly historians, partly journalists, in Israel saw the same material and also arrived at similar conclusions: that the way we understood Israel of 1948 was not right, and that the documents showed us a different reality than what we knew. We were called the group of people who saw things differently.. we were called the New Historians. And whether it’s a good term or not we can discuss later, but it’s a fact that they called us the New Historians, this is not to be denied.

Now what did we challenge about 1948? I think that’s very important to understand, the old picture, and the new picture, and then we can move on. The old picture was that, in 1948, after 30 years of British rule in Palestine, the Jewish Nation of the Zionist Movement was ready to accept an international offer of peace with the local people of Palestine. And therefore when the United Nations offered to divide Palestine into two states, the Zionist movement said yes, the Arab world and the Palestinians said no; as a result the Arab world went to war in order to destroy the state of Israel, called upon the Palestinian people to leave, to make way for the invading Arab armies; the Jewish leaders asked the Palestinians not to leave, but they left; and as a result the Palestinian refugee problem was created. Israel miraculously won the war, and became a fact. And ever since then the Arab world, and the Palestinians, have not ceased to want to destroy the Jewish state.

This is more or less the version we grew up with. Another mythology was that a major invasion took place in ’48, a very strong Arab contingent went into Palestine and a very small Jewish army fought against it. It was a kind of David and Goliath mythology, the Jews being the David, the Arab armies being the Goliath, and again it must be a miracle if David wins against the Goliath.

First of all, we found out that the Zionist leadership, the Israeli leadership, regardless of the peace plans of the United Nations, contemplated long before 1948 the dispossession of the Palestinians, the expulsion of the Palestinians.

So this is the picture. What we found challenged most of this mythology. First of all, we found out that the Zionist leadership, the Israeli leadership, regardless of the peace plans of the United Nations, contemplated long before 1948 the dispossession of the Palestinians, the expulsion of the Palestinians. So it was not that as a result of the war that the Palestinians lost their homes. It was as a result of a Jewish, Zionist, Israeli call it what you want plan that Palestine was ethnically cleansed in 1948 of its original indigenous population.

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